An artist’s impression of Queen’s Wharf.
An artist’s impression of Queen’s Wharf.

Mega projects to bring five years of disruption

BRISBANE residents will need to get used to some disruption as the city rolls out 10 mega projects worth more than $17 billion over the next five years.

But tourism and transport industry leaders at a Queensland Media Club lunch held yesterday to discuss the city's changing face say the disruption will be worth it.

 

Construction workers are seen unearthing rare electrical cables from the Queen's Wharf precinct in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/Stuart Layt
Construction workers are seen unearthing rare electrical cables from the Queen's Wharf precinct in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/Stuart Layt

The 10 projects include the $5.4 billion Cross River Rail, $3.6 billion Queen's Wharf resort, $2 billion Brisbane Live stadium, Waterfront Precinct, the new Brisbane Airport runway, Herston Quarter, West Village, Brisbane Metro, Howard Smith Wharves redevelopment and the Brisbane International Cruise Terminal.

Brisbane Deputy Mayor Adrian Schrinner said there would be some disruption during construction of the projects, including traffic snarls.

"But that will be short-term pain for long-term gain," Cr Schrinner said.

"If we didn't get on with building these projects, the traffic congestion and chaos will be permanent."

 

An artist’s impression of Queen’s Wharf.
An artist’s impression of Queen’s Wharf.

 

Cross River Rail Delivery Authority chief executive Graeme Newton said any disruption to traffic and other activities would be carefully managed.

For example, Mr Newton said that the soil extracted during tunnelling for the Cross River Rail would be brought to the surface at Woolloongabba where it could be shifted via the nearby motorway.

"There will be disruption but some of that disruption has been welcomed by people," Mr Newton said.

"We have announced that we will demolish the Roma Street Transit Centre as part of the project and that is good disruption."

The transit centre, built in the 1980s, has long been considered an architectural eyesore in the city.

Brisbane Airport Corporation chief executive Gert-Jan de Graaff said projects like the new runway and cruise terminal would bring hundreds of thousands more tourists into southeast Queensland.