STUCK FAST: It took almost 24 hours for a stranded 36-foot yacht to free itself from the Round Hill sandbar.
STUCK FAST: It took almost 24 hours for a stranded 36-foot yacht to free itself from the Round Hill sandbar.

Yacht runs aground at Seventeen Seventy

A 36-FOOT yacht ran aground at the entrance to Round Hill Creek, Seventeen Seventy early on Saturday night.

Volunteer Marine Rescue attempted to re-float the vessel at high tide Sunday morning but was unsuccessful.

The vessel managed to free itself Sunday evening at high tide and was escorted by VMR out of the creek.

 

A 36 foot yacht ran aground at the entrance to Round Hill Creek, Seventeen Seventy on June 9, despite the high tide.
People aboard the stranded yacht had to wait for a good high tide.

VMR secretary Josie Meng said it had been a lucky escape and the incident could easily have been prevented.

"Thankfully no one was seriously injured," Ms Meng said.

People just need to take the conditions on board. If they call (VMR) we can advise them.

 

A 36 foot yacht ran aground at the entrance to Round Hill Creek, Seventeen Seventy on June 9, despite the high tide.
VMR have made repeated warnings to boaters to call in before entering the Round Hill Creek entrance.

The skipper and three passengers were not locals.

Ms Meng said the vessel had a 1.7m keel.

She said if a vessel had over a 1.6m keel the people on board should get advice from VMR before trying to come into the creek.

"Anything over 1.7m is getting too dangerous," she said.

VMR has repeatedly called for the Queensland government to dredge the entrance to Round Hill Creek. At times, the water is too shallow to get the VMR rescue boat out.

The Department of Transport and Main Roads has previously stated there was no simple solution to the problem and that dredging would likely only be effective for a short period of time.

TMR said at the start of May it was conducting hydrographic surveys in the region.

Ms Meng said VMR had not heard anything further from the surveyors.