ACTION: Catholic School teachers across Queensland plan to take strike action from next week. (Pictured) Vanessa Dunbar marches with the IEU at a May Day march.
ACTION: Catholic School teachers across Queensland plan to take strike action from next week. (Pictured) Vanessa Dunbar marches with the IEU at a May Day march.

Work bans planned by Catholic school teachers

THREE Gladstone schools are among the 195 Queensland Catholic Schools expected to take part in work bans and potential stop work action from next week.

Independent Education Union Australia members from Chanel College, St Francis Catholic Primary School and St John the Baptist Catholic Primary School could take industrial action from Thursday.

Union members from Catholic schools across Queensland are demanding better job security, a revision of workload and work intensification, and wage parity.

Those taking part in the bans will not attend staff meetings or lunch duties, or take part in playground or transportation supervision.

They will also not respond to requests for data collection or analysis, except if there is a safety risk for students.

Strikes may be part of the action if demands are not met.

IEUA- Queensland Northern Territory branch secretary Terry Burke said regional areas such as Gladstone had higher rates of insecure work than metro areas.

“In our sector, some IEUA-QNT members across Queensland have reported being employed on rolling fixed-term contracts for as long as 15 years and have outlined the professional and personal hardship caused by the lack of secure work,” Mr Burke said.

He said Queensland Catholic schools had failed to listen to employees in regards to real measures to address the workload and work intensification, the prevalence and impact of insecure, contract-based work for teachers and school support staff and the need to maintain the 30-year wage parity Queensland Catholic schools have had with public schools.

Queensland Catholic Education Commission executive director Lee-Anne Perry said parents and students would be disadvantaged if the union went ahead with the action.

“Catholic school employers remain focused on finalising negotiations so staff can vote on a new agreement as soon as possible,” Dr Perry said.

“Employers have put forward an offer that includes a 2.5 per cent general wage increase, a generous package of improved benefits for Middle and Senior Leaders and increased pay for Highly Accomplished and Lead Teachers.

“Employers have also offered to cut classroom contact time for primary teachers to allow more time for collaboration.”

She said the union should focus on resolving outstanding issues and reaching an in-principle agreement.

The three schools and Catholic Education Diocese of Rockhampton declined to comment.