"I JUST THINK IT IS TIME”: Cherbourg Council CEO Warren Collins is retiring after more than 35 years in the role. Louise Cheer

Why Cherbourg council CEO is calling it a day after 35 years

WHEN Cherbourg Aboriginal Shire Council CEO Warren Collins first started in the role back in 1984, he was in charge of a team of just one other person.

That was more than 35 years ago.

Back then, Bob Katter was the minister for aboriginal affairs and with his assistance, the Cherbourg council was given the power and authority to make decisions for the town.

Cherbourg has come a long way since then thanks to the hard work of people like Mr Collins.

This year, the popular Cherbourg council leader is stepping down from the position he started way back on February 20, 1984.

He has already starting planning his first day of retirement.

"I'll probably sleep in,” he said.

"Play a bit more golf and go fishing.”

The president of the Cherbourg Hornets Rugby League Club said he would probably step down from that role in time as well.

"I just think it is time,” he said.

"I'd like to do some stuff with the family. There are places I'd still like to go and haven't been.”

After such a successful career, Mr Collins said he had many achievements he was proud of.

"It's pretty difficult to point at just one,” he said.

He paid special mention to the aged care home and other major upgrades throughout the community.

More recently, he said the new sewerage plant and recycling centre really showcased Cherbourg as an industry leader in the region.

After three and a half decades in one role, the Cherbourg administrator said there were a few things he could have done better.

"There are a few little regrets but nothing really,” he said.

"Hindsight is a great thing.”

Mr Collins offered some valuable advice for the person who would step into his large shoes as the next CEO of the Cherbourg Aboriginal Council: "You have always got to remember you are working for the community”.

"It needs to be someone who is able to listen,” he said.

Mr Collins said the next big focus for the community was employment.

"We need to try to create real employment,” he said.

He was confident he was hanging up his council boots at the ideal time.

"I wouldn't have stepped away if I wasn't sure there were some very good people working at council,” he said.

"Council is in a very good position.”