AWARENESS: A workshop next week gives residents the opportunity to get informed about Queensland's climate change policies.
AWARENESS: A workshop next week gives residents the opportunity to get informed about Queensland's climate change policies. alexsl

What's the Queensland government doing on climate change?

WE ALL need to be involved in the conversation about how to reduce our carbon emissions says Lisa Cliff, climate policy officer for the Queensland Conservation Council.

That's why she'll be speaking at community forums around Queensland this month about the state government's climate change policies.

"It doesn't take much to get up to speed," Ms Cliff said.

The forum, arranged for the Gladstone region by the Gladstone Conservation Council, will give residents an overview of the Queensland Government's Climate Transition Strategy, released in July.

The strategy's three principle tenets are:

  • Using 50 per cent renewable energy by 2030
  • Reducing emissions by at least 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030.
  • Achieving zero net emissions by 2050.

Ms Cliff said this strategy would rely on measures including the protection and enhancement of native forests, the protection of blue carbon stores (like mangroves) and investment in renewable energy projects.

She said while Queensland had much work to do, it was nonetheless "great to be in a state where (we) have climate policies that recognise climate change is an international issue".

Ms Cliff said the Queensland government, along with other state governments, were proving more proactive on this important issue than the federal government had been in recent years.

"The states recognise the potential adverse economic impacts (climate change) could have if they don't start taking on low carbon alternatives now," she said.

Ms Cliff said there was plenty the states could do without federal backing including providing incentives, guidelines or codes to help the private sector to invest in green technology.

But she said, there's still a role for the individual to consume differently for instance; by eating less red meat or choosing a fuel-efficient car.

Ms Cliff said up from the individual level, local governments could also play a role and councils, like the Sunshine Coast Council had already been realising the economic benefits of doing so.

FORUM DETAILS:

Monday April 16: Gladstone City Library, 9-11.30am AND

Agnes Water Community Centre, 4-6.30pm.

RSVP to Anna Hitchcock at gladstoneconservationcouncil@hotmail.com before midday April 13.

In your response, advise which forum you will attend.