A metre long Barra up a tree at Pikes Crossing. Photo Contributed
A metre long Barra up a tree at Pikes Crossing. Photo Contributed Contributed

Weather has been tough for the fish too

THIS recent bout of weather has been producing a mixed bag of interpretations of how the fishing is going in our region with many dead boney bream, barra, and other species, lying rotting in the debris, loads of fresh water in the harbour, especially on an incoming tide as the outflow from the Boyne River is pushed back up into the harbour before the outgoing releases it.

Many have seen the photo taken by one of the astronauts in the International Space Station as it cruised over us.

This was one of an incoming tide as the dirty water in the Boyne was carted further up the harbour.

As you can see those saltwater species have a lot to contend with, and many species will either be sitting on the bottom, or moved to a spot where it's a little more slater like Colosseum, Wild Cattle, Mondoolan, or maybe down to Turkey, Pancake and Middle Creek.

The reason why I say they could be sitting on the bottom in the harbour is because fresh will sit on top of the salt given the right conditions.

On the flip side, those chasing barra could be rubbing their hands together, as a huge amount of tucker has been washed down, and it could be like Christmas dinner if you were a barra.

The real dirty water too is holding the king salmon, as clients of Johnny Mitchell have discovered this week.

The other down side to this massive weather event, is the condition of the Boyne River and its mouth or channel.

Much has changed, and if I were venturing out, I wouldn't be relying on how deep this old channel is now.

You can almost count on the fact that it may not be there at all.

Local businessman, boat owner, and keen fisherman, Brad Anderson, slipped out the front on Sunday, and sounded the channel, or what was left of it, between the markers and 0.8 of a metre was about as deep as it got.

Even with the previous flood it wasn't this filled in, and now the river mouth resembles what it was like when I arrived here in 1982.

Best advice is to check your tides, as you should know how much water your boat needs to float, check the weather, because that will impact things a lot more, and always remember that it's a lot smoother, and safer, to cross these areas on an incoming tide, when the wind is blowing from the sea.

That reminds me about Jim Purcell's local boating knowledge session on Sunday, at the new VMR rooms at the north end of the Marina from 2pm, I can thoroughly recommend it. Give them a call and book a spot.

This weekend's weather isn't going to be all that flash with 15-20 knot easterlies predicted plus a big chance of some more rain.

Many have sent me pictures of dead and live fish, including the beaut Jack which Michaelene Bunting nailed in the harbour, which is posted on the Creek to Coast Facebook page. It measured 480mm, an absolute cracker! Check it out.

On a closing note I'd just like to thank all those volunteers who have been out and about this week cleaning up the shoreline.

A special thanks to Andre Taute, Robbie Waterson and their team for recovering most bits and pieces of our beloved Jetty.

THE BARRA BLOKE: Gladstone's own Johnny Mitchell is regarded as an authority on barramundi. Photo Contributed
THE BARRA BLOKE: Gladstone's own Johnny Mitchell is regarded as an authority on barramundi. Photo Contributed Contributed