Volunteers, from Lendlease spent four hours sorting through 182kg of marine debris collected by Eco Barge Clean Seas.
Volunteers, from Lendlease spent four hours sorting through 182kg of marine debris collected by Eco Barge Clean Seas.

The beach where 2kg of rubbish washes up every day

THEY have been sailing the high seas, collecting trash in order to understand the scale of the region's marine debris issue.

Eco Barge Clean Seas project co-ordinator Fiona Broadbent said a recent survey revealed about 2kg of marine debris washed up in Saba Bay on Hook Island in the Whitsundays every single day.

The data emerged after a sort and survey day at Airlie Beach on September 10.

The four-hour survey, conducted by team of 11 volunteers from Lendlease, sorted through 182kg of rubbish collected from Saba Bay.

 

Volunteers, from Lendlease spent four hours sorting through 182kg of marine debris collected by Eco Barge Clean Seas.
Volunteers, from Lendlease spent four hours sorting through 182kg of marine debris collected by Eco Barge Clean Seas.

 

Ms Broadbent said the volunteers counted 1157 plastic bottle tops, 230m of rope and 176 bottles.

Volunteers even recorded 76 thongs and shoe soles, although Ms Broadbent joked that they had never found a matching pair.

She said the survey gave the environmental group crucial data on what types and how much marine debris was in the region.

With an average of 215kg collected in each of the clean-up expeditions, and with more than 30 trips a year, Ms Broadbent said there was a staggering amount of marine rubbish in the region.

In a year Eco Barge Clean Seas volunteers would sort through around 6500kg of debris.

Lendlease group head of sustainability and Lendlease Foundation Cate Harris said the company's participation in the project was part of the annual local community day.