FUNDRAISER: Neil Golding is one of the faces of Relay for Life in Gladstone for 2019.
FUNDRAISER: Neil Golding is one of the faces of Relay for Life in Gladstone for 2019. Liana Walker

The battle with cancer from a carer's view

NEIL Golding has a list half a page long of people close to him who have had cancer.

On that list includes his two sons, his brother and both his parents.

Although a cancer survivor himself, it's the time he has spent as a carer for so many people around him that was the tougher battle.

It's the reason why he is one of the faces of Relay for Life in Gladstone this year.

He said one of the hardest parts of watching other people fight cancer was the mind games it played with you and the patient.

"Some will attack the cancer, put everything they've got into fighting it,” he said. "It is a big mind game in that a person has to cope with the idea they have this thing called cancer which is scary -they have to face the fact that they have mortality.”

Mr Golding was first touched by cancer as a young adult when his mother, Adelaide Golding, was diagnosed with breast cancer, which eventually claimed her life at the age of 61.

But it was 2012 which he described as a horror year.

Neil Golding with his sun Joshua while he was being treated for cancer.
Neil Golding with his son Joshua who was being treated for cancer. Contributed

His son Joshua was diagnosed with lymphoma in February, his other son Jared had a melanoma removed and his father Cyril Golding lost a short battle with acute myeloid leukaemia in November.

He said through this year he felt sometimes the patients weren't able to take in all of the information and it was important to help them make decisions. He said even small choices such as what to eat each day was difficult.

"Be there as a listener, go along to the doctors,” he said.

Joshua, now 32, has been in remission since March 2013.

Mr Golding's advice for others caring for cancer patients was to "keep going” and try not to do it alone.

"The sick person is sick 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” he said. "It's best if it's a two-person job so one can rest while the other is looking after the sick person.”

Relay For Life, July 27-28 at Chanel College. Visit relayforlife.org.au