(L-R) Captain Jason Scanes and his interrupter Hassan. Photo Camp HERO, Afghan National Army base in Kandahar Afghanistan April 2013.Jason has begun what promises to be a daily vigil until the Immigration Minister Peter Dutton will speak to him about a visa dispute. Captain Jason Scanes says he's tried for five years to have his former Afghan translator - who he says saved his life fighting the Taliban - brought to Australia for protection.Mr Scanes is protesting outside Minister Dutton's electorate office in Brisbane demanding answers about why his combat colleague has been denied safety in Australia.
(L-R) Captain Jason Scanes and his interrupter Hassan. Photo Camp HERO, Afghan National Army base in Kandahar Afghanistan April 2013.Jason has begun what promises to be a daily vigil until the Immigration Minister Peter Dutton will speak to him about a visa dispute. Captain Jason Scanes says he's tried for five years to have his former Afghan translator - who he says saved his life fighting the Taliban - brought to Australia for protection.Mr Scanes is protesting outside Minister Dutton's electorate office in Brisbane demanding answers about why his combat colleague has been denied safety in Australia.

MISSION COMPLETE: Dutton's office confirms case review

UPDATE: A spokeswoman from Home Affair's Minister Peter Dutton has confirmed the office has made contact with Mr Scanes.

The spokeswoman said the advisor  had a conversation with Mr Scanes and would be back in touch with him in the next few weeks.

She said at this stage the minister couldn't meet with Mr Scanes as he would be involved in reviewing Hassan's case and it would be a conflict of interest.

The spokeswoman said that did not mean the minister would not meet with the Maryborough veteran in the future.

"It may very well happen," she said.

"The case is being reviewed."

EARLIER: For five years, decorated Australian Army Captain Jason Scanes has been fighting what seemed like an uphill battle to bring his interpreter, Hassan, to Australia.

Now there is signs of victory for the Maryborough war veteran who was contacted by a spokesman from Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton's office and he was told Hassan's case would be made a priority.

Captain Jason Scanes (right) and his interrupter “Hassan” in Afghanistan.
Captain Jason Scanes (right) and his interrupter “Hassan” in Afghanistan.

Mr Scanes has spent the week outside Mr Dutton's office, proudly wearing his service medals, determined to protest for as long as it took to have someone speak with him.

His interpreter stood by him every day in Afghanistan while he served his country and he believes Hassan saved his life on more than one occasion.

Hassan's loyalty left Mr Scanes determined to return the favour, especially as Hassan's decision to support Allied troops left him under threat from the Taliban.

FIGHT FOR HASSAN: 'He saved my life, now we need to save his'

Already Hassan had been the target of a deliberate hit and run, which left him with his leg broken in three places.

Tom Fleming, an advisor to Mr Dutton, has now been in contact and has promised he will provide Mr Scanes with an update on Hassan's case within the next three weeks.

The news means he will be home in time to commemorate Anzac Day with his family and friends.

Speaking to the Chronicle, Mr Scanes said it was a relief to know that Hassan's case will be reviewed.

He said he knew the process would take time, but he was glad it was finally happening.

Decorated former army captain Jason Scanes is fighting to bring his Pashtun interpreter to Australia.
Decorated former army captain Jason Scanes is fighting to bring his Pashtun interpreter to Australia. Contributed

"I'm not completely unreasonable," he said.

"I'm not demanding an answer right now."

Mr Scanes said he wanted to discuss the general policy regarding the immigration of interpreters who assisted Australian soldiers in conflicts overseas as well as Hassan's case.

He said he was told the minister would be open to reviewing the current policy.

Mr Scanes said he was now confident the man who stood by his side in Afghanistan would soon be safe on Australian soil with his young family.

"And I'll be traveling to Sydney to meet with him when he arrives," he said.

"It will be a very exciting time."

The Chronicle has contacted Mr Dutton's office for a response.