Members of the Boyne-Tannum RSL included visiting newly elected District Deputy President Neville Tarry and his wife Karen (at end of table). Contributed photo
Members of the Boyne-Tannum RSL included visiting newly elected District Deputy President Neville Tarry and his wife Karen (at end of table). Contributed photo

Slice of Navy history on display at Boyne Island

THE stories of many Australian sailors have been overshadowed by soldiers at Gallipoli or the Western Front, but a travelling exhibition from the Australian National Maritime Museum hopes to ­enlighten the public on some forgotten tales.

War at Sea — The Navy in WWII, currently on display in Boyne Island, paints a picture of servicemen on the high seas and the families they left behind.

“It’s a history not a lot of people understand,” said Boyne-Tannum RSL sub-branch president Ian Anderson said.

“People have heard about the Anzacs but many people don’t know about the role the navy played.”

The display includes large panels printed with surprising stories, including that of Australia’s first submarine AE1 which disappeared off the coast of New Guinea during patrols.

The submarine and its 35 crew vanished more than 100 years ago on September 14, 1914 and their final resting place was not found until December 2017.

This mystery is examined alongside the story of Australia’s second submarine AE2, which became the first Allied vessel to breach the Dardanelles in Turkey.

The exhibition draws on the personal accounts of sailors through their diaries, mementos, ship’s’ logs and letters home, ­piecing together stories of drudgery at sea, patrols and blockades.

Mr Anderson said it was an important part of Australia’s history that would be especially informative for school age children.

He said members of the Boyne-Tannum RSL sub-branch would be on hand to answer questions.

War at Sea — The Navy in WWII will be on display at Boyne Plaza this week.