BALD BEAUTY: Gladstone State High School teacher Julie Hunt and deputy principal Shelley Slade said they would shave their heads if $5000 was raised.
BALD BEAUTY: Gladstone State High School teacher Julie Hunt and deputy principal Shelley Slade said they would shave their heads if $5000 was raised. Mike Richards GLA260318SHAV

Shorn in the name of school spirit

TY SOUTHWICK was the first person to lose his hair at Gladstone State High School.

He'd dyed it pink for the occasion and said he was motivated by having two family members with cancer.

"It's very cold, let's just say that," he said once he'd received his new hair style.

Nonetheless, he was glad he had it done it.

 

Ty Southwick was one of the students who lost his hair for a good cause.
GOOD CAUSE: Ty Southwick was the first to be shaved on the day. Mike Richards GLA260318PINK

Displaying the very best of school spirit, students at GSHS raised over $7000 in the lead up to their Shave for a Cure day yesterday.

They had one big incentive: Teacher Julie Hunt, and deputy principal Shelley Slade, had agreed to shave their heads if the students raised over $5000.

"Did I think they would get there? Mrs Slade asked.

"I did have my doubts, (but) they didn't just get there they blew it out of the water."

Mrs Slade said she was really proud of the students.

"What a good cause to raise money for, something that touches everybody's hearts. There's not many of us in the world it doesn't touch," she said.

Mrs Slade said she'd been contemplating the great shave for a number of years and was particularly keen to do it as her grandmother had suffered from multiple cancers before passing away.

 

Gladstone State High School teacher Julie Hunt and deputy principal Shelley Slade said they would shave their heads if $5000 was raised. True to their word both lost their locks.
NOT SO BAD: The teachers get the shave. Mike Richards GLA260318SHAV

Regarding her new hair style or lack of it, she was less certain.

"Was there meant to be a plan? Because I really don't have that yet. I haven't really given it much thought, I have pre-warned my hair dresser (though)," she laughed.

GSSH has participated in the Shave for a Cure for a number of years, but the students have really ramped it up over the past couple, said deputy principal Melissa Daniels.

"I think our students really are an altruistic bunch, they really do have a strong sense of community and of wanting to do things for others," she said.

"We have a number of people in our school community who have been affected by leukaemia and blood cancers so this is a cause that is very close to people's hearts."

Ms Daniels said she's been trying to convince her husband that she should undergo the shave.

"I've always wanted to do it, so who knows. watch this space," she laughed.

"Watch this head it could be up for auction. Maybe if they (the students) raise $10,000."

Liam Madsen, a senior student council member (the group which orchestrated the school's World's Greatest Shave Day), raised over $1000.

"My aunty has actually been diagnosed with a form of blood cancer," he said.

"She's in Brisbane, she's doing really well. And she's beaten it but it's just my personal reason for doing it this year."

He hadn't yet got the shave when The Observer caught up with him but he'd already undergone a rather painful looking partial leg wax - another option available to students on the day.

I spent half of one of one lesson just typing up an email to about seventy teachers, (to ask for donations) I was just trying to get as many as I could," he said.