The results of the 2019 Gladstone Harbour report card are similar to 2018, with environmental health scoring a C, social and economic health both receiving Bs and a C for cultural health.
The results of the 2019 Gladstone Harbour report card are similar to 2018, with environmental health scoring a C, social and economic health both receiving Bs and a C for cultural health.

REPORT CARD: How Gladstone Harbour’s health rates

Insights into the health of Gladstone Harbour have revealed which areas are doing well and where improvements can be made.

The release of the 2019 report card shows positive signs for seagrass, which improved from a D to a C compared with 2018.

The scores for mangroves and coral were similar to last year, but there were poor scores for fish recruitment and mud crabs.

This was offset with good results for fish health (B) and an impressive grade for water and sediment quality (A).

The strength of shipping and tourism industries were the main factors in maintaining an A for economic performance, but the overall grade dropped back to a B owing to a poor score for commercial fishing for the fourth consecutive year.

Overall the results are similar to 2018, with environmental health receiving a C, social and economic health both receiving B, and a C for cultural health.

The report card is an initiative of the Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership and was produced with the support of partners representing community, traditional owners, industry, science, government and harbour management.

After several years of the report being delivered, GHHP independent science panel chair professor John Rolfe was pleased with the progress.

"I'm proud to say that after six years, the 2019 report card now has a complete set of indicators and sub-indicators with the inclusion of fish health indicator this year," he said.

Report cards are a globally recognised method of reporting on waterway health and monitoring changes over time.

Rating indicators range from very poor (E) to very good (A).

There will be a more detailed report of the 2019 figures in Saturday's edition of The Observer.