Wade and Ben Hughes are excited about their new printer which is helping reduce Newprint HRG’s environmental impact
Wade and Ben Hughes are excited about their new printer which is helping reduce Newprint HRG’s environmental impact

Reducing environmental impact one corflute at a time

AS A printing company, Newprint HRG is mindful about the plastic and paper waste it produces and its newest investment helps mitigate some of the business' environmental impact.

It has invested in a new state-of-the-art HP printer that uses environmentally friendly inks and director Ben Hughes says it ticks all the boxes.

"We've been chasing this technology for about three years, watching it develop and making sure it's the right machine for us," Mr Hughes said.

"It's the first of its kind outside a major centre and the first in regional Australia."

Using water-based ink technology, the machine prints directly to the substrate, such as corflute, rather than to a layer of sticker.

"It eliminates that layer of plastic, which makes the recycling process a lot easier," Mr Hughes said.

"By printing direct, during the recycling process they're able to clean it very easily and recycle it."

Wade and Ben Hughes are excited about their new printer, the first of its kind in regional Australia
Wade and Ben Hughes are excited about their new printer, the first of its kind in regional Australia

The ink itself is important to the process and has Eco­Logo and Greenguard certifications, meaning it has low chemical emissions.

"Being a water-based ink, it's better for the environment, there's less wastage and no odour," Mr Hughes said.

"It's better for our workers, better for the end product and better for us."

Previously the company was using a direct to substrate printer with UV ink.

Mr Hughes said it was an aggressive chemical that made it difficult to dispose of and store.

"Now the print quality is better, the drying times are quicker and the end result is low impact on the environment," he said.

On top of using eco-friendly printing technologies, the business also tries to reduce waste by recycling and donating unused goods to schools and kindergartens.

Once a month, the business's used corflutes are sent back to the supplier for recycling.

"That gets made into a lower-grade corflute, which is then resold," Mr Hughes said.

"After that it's converted into building products like planter boxes and park benches."