Chris Jorgensen hasn’t caught a barramundi in the Boyne River since netting season opened.
Chris Jorgensen hasn’t caught a barramundi in the Boyne River since netting season opened. Emily Kemp

Recreational fishers concerned about over-fishing in Boyne

COMMERCIAL fishing in the Boyne River is banned for eight months of the year, but from midnight on April 30, it was a free-for-all.

Local recreational fisher Dennis Sullivan is concerned about the amount of fish being taken.

"On the night the river opened up, close to 10 tonnes of barramundi, that we know of, was taken on that one night. Potentially twice that," he said.

Mr Sullivan is quick to add he is not against commercial fishing.

"I have no problem with them netting. I've done it myself. It's bloody hard."

At the time, Mr Sullivan and his Gladstone Sportfishing Club were preparing for HookUp.

"That put bad blood against commercial fishermen," he said. "Tourism, (fishing) it's one of the biggest inputs into the Gladstone region."

Recreational fisher Chris Jorgensen said he hadn't caught a barra since netting season opened.

"It's how it is. It's their job," he said. "I kind of think there is a point where it should be mellowed off."

Local commercial fisher and Queensland Seafood Industry Association board member Trevor Falzon said all commercial fishers, regardless of where they were coming from, were within their rights on the Boyne.

"We only have it four months of the year. We have to pay for that right to fish. It's not a freebie."

Mr Falzon rejected the idea the river could be overfished.

"There's enough fish for everybody," he said.

Mr Falzon opposed more government regulation.

Queensland's Department of Fisheries didn't respond to questions before deadline.