One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson says there’s a double standard on tree clearing when it comes to solar farms in Queensland. Picture: AAP/Lukas Coch
One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson says there’s a double standard on tree clearing when it comes to solar farms in Queensland. Picture: AAP/Lukas Coch

One Nation: Pauline Hanson wants QLD solar farms banned

PAULINE HANSON wants solar farms banned from tree clearing in Queensland.

The One Nation Leader insists it's duplicitous of Labor to criminalise primary producers for knocking over trees while allowing renewable energy proponents to clear vast tracts of land.

Senator Hanson's comments come ahead of a rally at State Parliament today protesting tough new vegetation management laws, which are expected to be debated this week.

"Labor continues to demonise traditional Queensland farmers by treating them like criminals, while laying out the red carpet for solar farmers to pay off green debts," Senator Hanson told The Courier-Mail.

 

One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson says there’s a double standard on tree clearing when it comes to solar farms in Queensland. Picture: AAP/Lukas Coch
One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson says there’s a double standard on tree clearing when it comes to solar farms in Queensland. Picture: AAP/Lukas Coch

 

"By attacking Queensland farmers over select clearing but allowing solar farmers to clear huge tracks of bushland, Labor has shown it doesn't care about primary producers, it doesn't care about the environment, it only cares about keeping the greenies happy so they can farm their preferences."

"If the Labor Premier wants to follow through with these unhinged laws, I'll be calling on Annastacia Palaszczuk to ban the clearing of land for ­future solar farms.

"What's good for the goose, must be good for the gander."

The laws ban broadscale clearing of remnant vegetation for agriculture and reduce the age of protected "high value regrowth" from 28 to 15 years.

Almost 400,000ha of vegetation was cleared in 2015-16 after Queensland's previous vegetation management laws were amended by the former Newman government.

The Palaszczuk Government says clearing rates rose substantially after the LNP changes and wildlife would be pushed to extinction if it continues.

But farmers insist the laws would lock up 1.7 million hectares of farmland with no compensation and limit their ability to reduce encroachment of woody weeds.

Queensland Conservation Council head Tim Seelig has accused farmers of spearheading a dishonest campaign.

"We have seen periods of both rapidly declining and rapidly rising rates of land clearing in Queensland over the last 20 years, reflecting stronger and then weaker laws," Dr Seelig said.

"Over this time, agricultural productivity overall has been pretty stable.

"There is simply no evidence that stronger land clearing laws will impact on agricultural productivity, which is actually affected by commodity prices, exchange rates, droughts and weather events."