CAUGHT: One of the toad traps used by the Gladstone branch of the Conservation Volunteers Australia group.
CAUGHT: One of the toad traps used by the Gladstone branch of the Conservation Volunteers Australia group. Conservation Volunteers Australi

Our toads tamed by volunteers

THE cane toads will be short on numbers this year.

No, not the Queensland State of Origin team, but one of the state's biggest pests.

Cane toad numbers have been dramatically reduced across the Gladstone region thanks to the work of the team at Conservation Volunteers Australia.

Funded by the Gladstone Regional Council, the cane toad mitigation program made a huge dent on the species' numbers during this year's toad season.

The CVA are in their eighth year and managed to humanly wipe out over 5000 cane toads over the 12-week "Toad Busters" season which began on January 17 and concluded last night.

Conservation Volunteers Australia Gladstone regional manager Linda Fahle said that this season has been a success in helping to reduce cane toad numbers around the region.

"Last year we got over 6000 toads in Gladstone with 200 volunteers," Ms Fahle said.

"Our biggest haul this year was over 1000 toads in one hour."

Mayor Matt Burnett said the program aimed to increase public education and awareness of new cane toad control technologies, specifically the use of baits.

"The baits will use the toxin of adult cane toads to remove tadpoles from water bodies, without harming frogs and other native wildlife," Cr Burnett said.