FILE - In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, file photo, former Olympic and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt controls the ball during a charity soccer match between members of the 1998 World Cup winning French team and a team of international veteran players who were also involved in the same tournament, at the U Arena in Nanterre, north of Paris, France. Bolt is making a run at professional soccer in Australia. Now, at 31, he will try out for six weeks with the Central Coast Mariners starting next month. If all goes well, he could play for a season in Australia's A-League.  (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, file photo, former Olympic and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt controls the ball during a charity soccer match between members of the 1998 World Cup winning French team and a team of international veteran players who were also involved in the same tournament, at the U Arena in Nanterre, north of Paris, France. Bolt is making a run at professional soccer in Australia. Now, at 31, he will try out for six weeks with the Central Coast Mariners starting next month. If all goes well, he could play for a season in Australia's A-League. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File) Thibault Camus

OPINION: Like a Bolt out of the blue, he has nothing to lose

OPINION: The news Usain Bolt is preparing to trial for professional A-League football club Central Coast Mariners has raised some eyebrows, achieving just what it's set out to do.

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2012, file photo, Jamaica's Usain Bolt, center, gestures before competing in a men's 100-meter heat in the athletics competition at the Olympic Stadium during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.  A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire. The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2012, file photo, Jamaica's Usain Bolt, center, gestures before competing in a men's 100-meter heat in the athletics competition at the Olympic Stadium during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire. The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File) Matt Dunham

The move has been labelled nothing more than a publicity stunt by some, but in reality the Mariners likely aren't the only instigators.

Bolt's interest to become a professional footballer has never been swept under the rug and his love for Manchester United is obvious.

He's trialled with clubs in England's lower divisions recently in an attempt to make the dream a reality, but the athletics superstar has fallen short of offers of elusive professional contracts.

The move to work with head coach Mike Mulvey on the Central Coast of NSW, is no doubt an attempt as much from Bolt to keep his name in football circles around the globe.

But with all the negativity surrounding the potential move, in reality, it's a win-win situation for the struggling A-League.

The criticism surrounding the move is that it cheapens the league with many pundits arguing that football in Australia should be luring big name football stars, not athletics stars.

But with a six-week trial touted upon Bolt's arrival, the spot in the team will not go lightly - he will still have to pass the clubs rigorous tests to prove he can indeed play at the highest level.

If he's good enough and he signs, it's a win for the league and the Central Coast.

Usain Bolt of Jamaica kneels at the finish line during his retirement ceremony following the World Athletics Championships in London on Aug. 13, 2017. (Kyodo)==Kyodo
Usain Bolt of Jamaica kneels at the finish line during his retirement ceremony following the World Athletics Championships in London on Aug. 13, 2017. (Kyodo)==Kyodo

The publicity could not be imagined and the potential money draw of such an athlete playing in Australia's professional league is mouth-watering.

Should the trial be unsuccessful for Bolt, however, it places Australian football at a big advantage.

A failed trial from Bolt shows the strength of the league and proves that spots cannot be simply purchased with fame, money and reputation.

It will be proof that the league holds high standards and is not simply a retirement home for aging stars or athletes from completely different sports, and is willing to reject money for quality.

The caveat is, if Bolt moves to the A-League without first being able to provide the goods, the look for an already struggling FFA may be severely problematic.

It's a high risk situation with the potential to bolster the league whether Bolt signs a full time contract or not, but only time will tell if the FFA can finally play their cards right.