Anti-Adani protesters Frontline Action on Coal on the Adani Carmichael mine site. Picture: Frontline Action on Coal
Anti-Adani protesters Frontline Action on Coal on the Adani Carmichael mine site. Picture: Frontline Action on Coal

Opinion: ‘I must question Adani’s actual investment’

MATT Canavan was so excited about the Coal in India 2019 report and the enormous opportunities it predicted for Queensland, that I was compelled to read it myself.

What I read were sentences like, 'The pace of India's coal production growth will be the key driver of its future thermal coal import needs' and 'The Indian government is aiming for self-sufficiency in thermal coal' and 'The role of coal in future energy systems will be determined by the balancing of the priorities of energy security, energy equity, and environmental sustainability' and, finally, 'India's power utilities are expected to remain financially constrained and consequently relatively price sensitive in the years to come, restricting their ability to purchase more expensive and better quality Australian coal. Thus, Australian coal will likely continue to be less attractive for Indian buyers.'

The report also cites the lack of Indian investment in Australian mines, the exception being Adani, but I must question Adani's actual investment in Australia when:

1. It owes a 1.5-billion-dollar debt on Abbot Point;

2. It will get its water for free;

3. It will pay no royalties to Australia for at least five years.

Lucas Dow reports a 'potential' for 4000 jobs if the mines in the Galilee Basin go ahead. That's 4000 jobs in eight mines over a period of 60 years (three generations).

Now, it's been a while since I was in school, but I'm pretty sure those numbers equate to fewer than 200 mining jobs per year in exchange for Queensland's Galilee Basin, its water and, 'potentially', its agriculture.

With this preponderance of uncertainties, the Adani Carmichael mine needs to be stopped in its tracks now!

Brooke McReynolds, Mackay

 

Mould problems

REGARDING the 2008 flood and the mould problem.

Yes, Palmview Retirement Village did have some homes flooded, but so many homes in Mackay area did as well. This wasn't normal and should not happen again.

We do live in the tropics where mould occurs, but we have our trusty Sno White or vinegar or oil of cloves and Wet'n'Forget.

The thing with those floods (we're now 11 years on) was how our village reacted. Management and staff must have called on all relations and friends (who could get here safely) to come and help. Wet carpets were removed before the end of that day. Houses were checked.

Because we are a village and had builders etc, on hand, once assessments were made things were under way.

We, as residents, did not have the worry of contacting assessors, builders, etc, people to dry out some homes. It was done for us. All we needed to do was contact our insurance for contents and insurance.

The village, residents, management and staff worked as one, and still do. Our village has so much to offer, but knowing you are secure and have people in charge who really care is at the top of the list.

Doreen Stanieg, North Mackay 

 

Thank you for tender loving care

HAVING just lost my wife of 69 years to the dreaded cancer, I would like to say a hearty thank you to Dr Luke Notley, doctors, nurses and general staff at Mackay Base Hospital and also the Mackay Mater Hospital for their tender loving care they bestowed on my wife.

My thanks also go to the Blue Care nurses and the staff of Integrated Living for their wonderful care and attention.

These wonderful people deserve all the praise for their dedication to their work.

May they continue with their chosen profession.

Herb Goleby, West Mackay