the celebration of the native title determination, at Gladstone Marina, November 28, 2017.
the celebration of the native title determination, at Gladstone Marina, November 28, 2017. Matt Taylor GLA281117TITLE

OPINION: Country's indigenous culture to be valued

I FIND it almost incomprehensible that in 2017 indigenous Australians are not recognised under our constitution.

For the past few years, issues of equality have dominated our social and political landscape.

I can't begin to imagine what it must feel like to not be recognised in the only homeland you've ever known, one your ancestors have inhabited for thousands of years.

Until we address this, Australia as a nation can make no claim to equality.

Children spend 12 years at school studying history and yet graduate with no real understanding of our own national history.

There are some who say the past is the past.

"I didn't do it so why should I have to accept responsibility for it?"

The answer is simple.

In order to understand the present, we have to understand the past. What led to the situation we are faced with today?

How have indigenous Australians become second-class citizens in a country that claims to be egalitarian?

What has led to the huge gap in health, education and justice for them?

In order to fix it, we have to understand it.

Despite that, indigenous Australians recognise the value of their culture, and they are not the only ones.

International visitors in particular are fascinated by Australia's traditional culture.

It's big business and it's wonderful to see our local indigenous groups taking it by the horns.

I wish them every success with this venture which, once established here, is planned for other communities north, along the Great Barrier Reef.

This unique idea has the potential to bring a lot of tourism attention.

- Christine McKee, Editor