RELIABLE SUPPLY: Mako Tidal Turbines chief executive officer Douglas Hunt and Gladstone Ports Corporation chief executive officer Peter O'Sullivan discuss the six-month tidal turbine demonstration due to start soon at Barney Point.
RELIABLE SUPPLY: Mako Tidal Turbines chief executive officer Douglas Hunt and Gladstone Ports Corporation chief executive officer Peter O'Sullivan discuss the six-month tidal turbine demonstration due to start soon at Barney Point. Tegan Annett

Renewable tidal turbine energy trialled at Gladstone Port

A NEW wave of reliable renewable energy will be trialled at the Port of Gladstone for six months in the hope of breaking new ground in broadening Australia's energy mix.

GPC has partnered with MAKO Tidal Turbines Pty Ltd to investigate how tidal flows at the Port of Gladstone can be harnessed to produce electricity.

A MAKO turbine will be attached to existing structures at Barney Point Terminal in an Australian-first tidal turbine demonstration involving port infrastructure.

The trial, expected to start by August, will explore potential environmental impacts, and the possibility of expanding it into a long-term operation.

MTT chief executive Douglas Hunt said the trial would determine how tidal energy could contribute to Australia's energy mix by producing clean and predictable renewable energy.

Mr Hunt said the terminal was the perfect location for a tidal turbine with 200 million tonnes of water flowing in and out of the harbour four times a day.

He said the trial was a variation and improvement on technology used during a similar trial the company completed at Tasmania.

GPC chief executive Peter O'Sullivan said the company was committed to energy efficiency.

"These initiatives are just the start of our renewable energy journey," Mr O'Sullivan said.

Tidal energy involves the conversion of kinetic energy in free-flowing water into electricity.

Iit is a reliable source of renewable energy which can be used for renewable baseload electricity when coupled with battery storage.