Trinity College Gladstone Year 8 student Kiera Andrew and teacher Andrew Young working online doing maths yesterday
Trinity College Gladstone Year 8 student Kiera Andrew and teacher Andrew Young working online doing maths yesterday

Mixed experiences for first day of e-learning

TRINITY College Gladstone's Keira Andrew loved her e-lesson in maths, while hundreds of thousands of state school students saw the government's online portal crash when they logged in this morning.

The Year 8 student said they were well prepared to learn via the online platform after a practice day in week 10 of Term 1.

She said she wasn't daunted by the fact that this would be the new normal for at least the next five weeks.

"You get equal amounts of education online as in the classroom," she said.

"It is different though because it's quieter without all the noise in the classroom of a usual lesson.

"I think it will run well for the next five weeks since we have already had a practice run and know how it works."

Principal Stephen Babbage said 100 of the school's 525 students attended yesterday across kindergarten, primary and high school.

He said all lessons for high school students were being facilitated for those at home through online conferencing platform Zoom, as synchronous online learning.

"Our motto through this situation is powering on with education," he said.

"The teachers upload all the lessons, worksheets and assessments through Google classroom so all the students can access them."

 

Trinity College Gladstone Year 8 student Kiera Andrew and teacher Andrew Young working online doing maths yesterday
Trinity College Gladstone Year 8 student Kiera Andrew and teacher Andrew Young working online doing maths yesterday

Primary school students received learning packs, Mr Babbage said, which can be used by parents following a recommended schedule.

"We collect the work that needs marking each week and are issuing a new learning pack each week," he said.

State school students struggled in their first day back for Term 2, with the Queensland Government's learning@home portal crashing just before 9am, leaving an estimated more than 700,000 of 870,000 students stuck at home unable to learn.

"High demand on some Department web servers has seen a temporary disruption to the learning@home website this morning," the department said in a Facebook message.

"Every effort is being made to restore services."

An Education Department spokeswoman said we saw some 1.8 million hits in less than half an hour on the website this morning at around 9am.

"This high traffic eased throughout the morning," the spokeswoman said.

The learning@home website was available to most users by late morning.

"Queensland state schools saw a physical attendance rate of some 12 per cent today," the spokeswoman said.