Aras Moran, at Nhulundu Health Centre, is training to be a midwife specialising in indigenous services.
Aras Moran, at Nhulundu Health Centre, is training to be a midwife specialising in indigenous services. Jen Tybell

Midwife to her people

ARAS Moran is a woman determined to play a role in indigenous health.

The 27-year-old is training to be a midwife and says it has been a long-held ambition to practice midwifery within the indigenous community.

“I have been interested (in midwifery) for ages,” said Ms Moran, herself of indigenous heritage.

“It was really midwifery I had been hoping to get into, because there are hardly any indigenous nurses or midwives.”

Ms Moran was one of six candidates in Australia to be accepted in Australian Catholic University’s Bachelor of Midwifery Indigenous Program. She has two more years until she is qualified.

She has a full-time job at Nhulundu Health Service and studies in her spare time, with trips to Brisbane for training.

She believes there is a lack of indigenous midwives.

“Indigenous people might be more comfortable visiting the midwife if it is someone they can better relate to.

“Having somebody in your community that you know, if it is a familiar face, they will go and get the care they need.”