Beenleigh State High is using its own produce to help raise money for struggling farmers. Picture: Nigel Hallett
Beenleigh State High is using its own produce to help raise money for struggling farmers. Picture: Nigel Hallett

School helps bale out farmers by selling steer

PICTURES of bone-thin stock and dusty fields have stirred everyone, from students to politicians, into action.

Last week, the Queensland Government threw $100,000 into a newly launched drought appeal, to help the 23 drought-declared local council areas across the state.

Locally, Beenleigh State High School are doing their bit to ensure agriculture remains viable for farmers in the grip of drought.

The school is hoping to raise $5000 - or two truck loads of hay - by donating one of their steers from their Droughtmaster stud.

Year 10 students Ty Henzell and Kylie Moratti with some of the strawberries that will be sold to help rally funds for farmers. Picture: Nigel Hallett
Year 10 students Ty Henzell and Kylie Moratti with some of the strawberries that will be sold to help rally funds for farmers. Picture: Nigel Hallett

The steer, to be processed free-of-charge by Teys Australia abattoir in Beenleigh, will be sold on meat trays to the school community.

Macadamia honey from the school's three beehives and hand-picked strawberries from 1000 plants will also be sold to the community.

Head of hospitality and agriculture Peta Lenane said the drought affected everyone and with a "steer to spare" - they sprung into action.

"We've seen so much in the news about the drought that we thought it would be good to do something big because it's such an urgent situation," she said.

The school will also sell its macadamia honey.
The school will also sell its macadamia honey.

The school will also host a staff breakfast as part of the fundraiser.

"So if anyone wants, they can pay $50 for a piece of banana bread," Ms Lenane said.

Ms Lenane said the chain effect of the drought will hit much closer to home for a lot of students - many whose parents work at Teys.

"This very much affects our community," she said.

"So its about supporting the industry that supports us. We all need food security."

Beenleigh State High School students Blair Johnson, Isabel Sammes, Coen Telehin and Michelle Haase.
Beenleigh State High School students Blair Johnson, Isabel Sammes, Coen Telehin and Michelle Haase.

The money raised will go to the Buy a Bale charity.

"We know first hand how expensive hay is so the more (we can raise), the better," she said.

Ms Lenane said they hope to continue the fundraising throughout the year.

"This is not just a current issue, it's an all the time issue," she said.