Lives on the line as animals flood in to RSPCA

Looking to adopt a dog are Tanika Duers and Annika Maloney with RSPCA Adoption Centre employee Karen Uridge.
Looking to adopt a dog are Tanika Duers and Annika Maloney with RSPCA Adoption Centre employee Karen Uridge. Andrew Backhouse

LIVES are on the line at the RSPCA.

Dogs and cats face death row unless an urgent call for foster carers is met.

The adoption centre in Gladstone is near capacity and if carers and families can't be found to home them, dogs and cats will have to pay the ultimate price.

Friends of the RSPCA president Judy Whicker said although the organisation was still accepting dogs, it had been unable to take on cats for the past three months.

That means that no cats have been saved from the pound in the past three months with every cat being put down due to lack of space.

"The root of the problem is that people aren't desexing their animals," she said on Wednesday.

"Cats can have three litters a year and a total of 10 to 12 kittens, which can quickly add up.

"We can't take them because we've only got four cat foster carers and one of them has 80 cats on acreage with big pens and cages."

She said the organisation was having a hard time re-homing big dogs.

"People aren't interested in very big dogs like bull arabs and bull mastiffs," she said.

"They get impounded and people won't pay the money to get them back."

Carer Anita Coad has around 30 cats at her house.

"It rips my heart out when they get put down," she said.

"It's not our fault (Friends of RSPCA) and it's not council's, it's the fault of irresponsible owners in the region, who aren't desexing their 'backyard breeders'.

"People should go to the pound and see the cats' faces.

"The deaths are totally unnecessary."