Gladstone Regional Council has signed a legal requirement under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act, 1992.
Gladstone Regional Council has signed a legal requirement under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act, 1992. David Nielsen

Law requires wildlife spotting to relocate displaced animals

GLADSTONE's industry, residential and population boom has caused wildlife carers to be inundated with native animals and birds seriously in need of care.

With the clearing of bushland to make way for housing and development, animals and birds are losing their homes, leaving them stranded roadside - a trend that looks likely to continue.

Gladstone and District Wildlife Carers president Jodi Jones said she had seen an increase in animals struck by cars or in need of a new home after a rise in residential development.

Gladstone Regional Council has signed a legal requirement under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act, 1992.

Council's Environmental portfolio spokesperson Cr Col Chapman said this utilises a qualified wildlife spotter to relocate displaced native animals during any Gladstone Region Council vegetation clearing activity.

"Our records provided by the contracted wildlife spotter indicates that approximately 300 native animals have been displaced by GRC activities over the last two years," Cr Chapman said.

The council has been imposing conditions upon the larger residential subdivisions to ensure that a spotter is compulsory, although this has only been a recent occurrence.

Cr Chapman said a development approval was current for four years, and there might be developments under recent construction which did not have the condition imposed of providing spotters.

If you have struck down a native animal on our roads, please contact the Gladstone and District Wildlife Carers on 0427 106 803.