SENDING A MESSAGE: Gladstone artist Christine Holden with her fisherman sculpture at the 2018 Boyne Tannum HookUp.
SENDING A MESSAGE: Gladstone artist Christine Holden with her fisherman sculpture at the 2018 Boyne Tannum HookUp. Mike Richards GLA040518HOOK

Labour of love turning heads at HookUp

TURNING trash into treasure is what local artist Christine Holden does best.

But she also cares deeply about our waterways and is making sure other people do too.

After turning heads at last year's Boyne Tannum HookUp with her barramundi sculpture made from recyclable marine materials, Christine is back with a bang with her latest creation, The Fisherman.

Christine Holden's marine debris sculpture - a 4.5m barramundi she made for the 2017 HookUp.
Christine Holden's marine debris sculpture - a 4.5m barramundi she made for the 2017 HookUp. Matt Harris

She specialises in ethical art, transforming what most would label as rubbish.

"Last year to introduce everybody to what we're all about we built the 4.5m barra, who has become quite well known in the area and he's back again this year as a display,” she said.

"He was so well received the (Gladstone) Healthy Harbour Partnership sponsored me again this year to present another public art project.”

While last year's barramundi sculpture was predominantly made with fishing net and fishing line, the 2018 sculpture centred on plastics.

"The fishing nets and lines are out there, but it's not the same as the plastics being collected,” Christine said.

"I wanted to draw more attention to (plastics).”

Christine Holden with the marine rubbish prior to making the fisherman sculpture. Boyne Tannum HookUp 2018.
Christine Holden with the marine rubbish prior to making the fisherman sculpture. Boyne Tannum HookUp 2018. Contributed

Materials for the fisherman sculpture were mainly sourced from cigarette lighters, but also other household plastic items.

"The plastics have mainly come from Chilli Beach in Arnhem Land,” Christine said.

"There's a wonderful man, Ian Anderson, who joined forces with Tangaroa Blue and they're an organisation who organise beach clean-ups all over Australia.

"Chilli Beach is one of the main catchment areas where rubbish gets washed up.

"Ian combined a trip up there with a family holiday an promised to bring me in some rubbish, which he delivered.

"He brought back about four bags full; one was rope and the rest was mainly lighters and toothbrushes.”

Gladstone artist Christine Holden with a sculpture made entirely from marine debris. Boyne Tannum HookUp 2018.
Gladstone artist Christine Holden with a sculpture made entirely from marine debris. Boyne Tannum HookUp 2018. Contributed

Christine used a total of six bags of plastic rubbish, estimated at 15kg each.

The sculpture took seven days to complete with Christine spending several hours each day on the project.

  • Christine will be holding marine debris sculpting workshops at Bray Park today and tomorrow from 9am.