CALLOUS ACT: Annette Patersen can’t understand why anyone would want to poison her dog Dags, aged 14.
CALLOUS ACT: Annette Patersen can’t understand why anyone would want to poison her dog Dags, aged 14. Tom Huntley

Keep an eye out for cruelty with dog baiting in Gladstone

WITH two separate incidents of animal cruelty this week, the RSPCA is calling for the public to be vigilant and help bring perpetrators to account.

The shocking baiting of a pet dog and apparent poisoning of six crows near Kin Kora State School, suggests acts of animal cruelty are on the rise.

RSPCA regional inspector Laurie Stageman said both incidents were very concerning.

"Animal cruelty is one of the lowest acts a person can do," he said.

"To let an animal die by being poisoned is very cruel."

Check your yards, check your friends' yards.

He said incidents of animal cruelty in the region appear to occur at random.

"You may hear nothing for a year and then suddenly there's a baiting," he said.

Mr Stageman said barking dogs and hate towards neighbours accounts for a majority of the baiting.

"Instead of speaking to the owner or the council they try and get rid of the problem themselves," he said.

"We can only try and deter people with penalties."

In Queensland, persons responsible for acts of animal cruelty can be penalised under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001.

The maximum penalty is $100,000 or two years in jail.

But bringing those responsible to account can be difficult. "Unless there's a person of interest, it's very difficult to prosecute," he said.

"If no one has witnessed the incident or heard threats being made, not much can be done."

Mr Stageman said people need to be vigilant.

"Check your yards, check your friends' yards," he said.

"Remove things that shouldn't be there."

"If you see suspicious behaviour, report it to the RSPCA or Crime stoppers."

Dog survives after poisoning in backyard

Annette Patersen nearly lost her best friend this week after a shocking act of animal cruelty that has rocked West Gladstone residents.

On Tuesday night, Annette came home from work to find her 14-year-old mini fox terrier-cross Maltese gravely ill.

"There's never been an occasion when he hasn't been right behind the front door, but he wasn't there," she said.

"When I walked in, I could see green vomit everywhere and then I saw Dags lying by the sink."

"I thought he was dead."

Annette Patersen was horrified to find poisoned chicken necks strewn around her backyard. Photo Contributed
Annette Patersen was horrified to find poisoned chicken necks strewn around her backyard. Photo Contributed Contributed GLA020513NECKS

Annette said Dags was disorientated and his eyes were rolling around in his head.

Soon after, she made a horrifying discovery in the backyard.

"There were all these green things lying around," she said.

"They looked like chicken necks, but I knew even off chicken doesn't go that colour."

Annette then realised someone had poisoned her dog.

"I grabbed all the necks into a bag and we rushed to the vet," she said.

"They confirmed he'd been poisoned and said it was in the hands of God."

Thankfully, Dags defied the odds and survived the callous attack.

Annette still struggles to comprehend what has happened.

"Everyone in my street is horrified; they couldn't believe we might lose Dags," she said.

"I've never had any complaints about him; he's not a barker."

Gladstone police are investigating the incident.

Contact Crime Stoppers with any information.