Inside Tamil family’s island stay

THE conditions that the Tamil family will live in on Christmas Island for the foreseeable future have been revealed in new pictures, as their supporters prepare for a mammoth court fight.

A children's playground with a slide and climbing facilities supplements basic but modest living space which includes air-conditioning.

 

The Tamil family’s Christmas Island accommodation includes a play area.
The Tamil family’s Christmas Island accommodation includes a play area.

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton confirmed that this would be the families home until their legal bid to stay in Australia is resolved, a court process which is expected to last several months.

Mr Dutton also revealed he has only used Ministerial discretion to intervene in three immigration cases involving people who arrived by boat.

Two of these were translators who served with Aussie troops in the Middle East who would be killed if they returned to their country of origin, and another was an orphaned Rohingya fleeing genocide.

The Federal Court ruled yesterday that the family had a case to be heard and that the government would be barred from deporting them until it had been finalised.

Nadesalingam and Priya and their two daughters have been fighting to stay in Australia, despite the parents arriving illegally by in 2013 and 2014, and gained support from their adopted home in Biloela.

 

Some of the facilities inside the Christmas Island detention centre.
Some of the facilities inside the Christmas Island detention centre.

While numerous other courts have found they were not refugees, their latest case is centred around their two-year-old child who was born in Australia.

Mr Dutton said they would remain on Christmas Island "for their own safety", but were not being kept in detention.

"That's the safest place for a number of reason, particularly given the violence and the activism of some of the supporters of this family," he told 2GB.

Priya says the family must stay inside the compound.
Priya says the family must stay inside the compound.

Priya, speaking to Sky News, denied they were free to walk around.

"We are kept in the detention centre, we can't go outside this compound … we have no access to go outside of this compound," she said.

The lawyer representing the family Carina Ford said she expected the case could take months to be heard.

A date for the next hearing is yet to be set.