Gladstone Police Station. Picture: Rodney Stevens
Gladstone Police Station. Picture: Rodney Stevens

Illegal dirt bike riders on police radar

UNLICENSED people are riding unregisterable dirt bikes all around Gladstone roads every day, breaking the law and destroying the reputation of legal riders and the sport.

According to Queensland law, any motorcycle that is ridden on the roads must be Australian Design Rules ADR compliant, the motorbike must be registered, insured and the rider must be licensed.

To comply with ADR regulations, motorcycles go through stringent emissions laws, noise testing and safety compliance.

Senior Sergeant Jamie Goodwin said while police were called to relatively few instances of dirt bikes being ridden on local roads, Gladstone region officers were always on the lookout.

“Gladstone Police are continually undertaking proactive patrols to target the illegal riding of unregistered and uninsured motor bikes on roads within the Gladstone region,” he said.

“All motor bikes must be registered and insured to be used on a road and failing to do this can carry a penalty in excess of $700.”

A person rides an unregistered and uninsured quad bike through the Philip Street roadworks recently.
A person rides an unregistered and uninsured quad bike through the Philip Street roadworks recently.

Anyone who wants to ride an unregistered motorbike on private property, Snr Sgt Goodwin said, must obey the law and trailer their bike there.

“If riders wish to use an unregistered motor bike on private property it is important that it is transported on a trailer to the address and people do not take the risk and ride it unregistered to the property.

“This can have significant consequences if there is an accident and could potentially reduce access to third party insurance for the people involved.

“It is very timely to reinforce the risk to all road users as the weather starts to warm up and our weekends are spent outdoors.”

A worker on the Philip Street construction site, who asked not to be named, said they regularly got unregisterable dirt bikes and even quad bikes ridden illegally through the 40kmh roadworks.

“They line up in the traffic like they own the roads and ride through the roadworks all the time, they do wheel stands through the site and all,” he said.

“I own several motorcycles, I am licensed and have been for decades, but these people are on bikes that can’t even be registered or identified.

“It’s illegal and if one of them comes off or is involved in a crash they could be seriously injured or killed.

A person rides an unregistered and uninsured quad bike through the Philip Street roadworks recently.
A person rides an unregistered and uninsured quad bike through the Philip Street roadworks recently.

“It gives the recreational motorcyclists a bad name because people think all motorbike riders are like that, which they aren’t.”

The Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads states: “The motorcycle standards are set to ensure your bike is safe to ride.”

“These standards cover the design, construction and legal modifications.”

“The standards for motorcycles, mopeds and motor trikes can vary depending on the Australian Design Rule (ADR) category and the date of manufacture of your bike.”

In Queensland, if a motorcycle is modified in any way, it must comply to ADR’s, which includes tyres, brakes, lights, exhaust system, frame and suspension, plus more.

Queensland Government legislation states even in State Forests and national parks, motorcycle riders must be licensed.

“It’s too dangerous (and it’s illegal) for kids to be riding around and sharing the roads with other users like four wheel drivers, logging trucks and other users,” the Queensland Government states.

Legal Clubs like the Gladstone District Dirt Riders hold events at the Benaraby Motocross track and the Curtis Coast Trailriders Club hold legal enduro rides in surrounding bushland.

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