POWERING AHEAD: Gladstone Power Station's safety team Kaitlin Darrach, David Greinke, Jayd McKenzie.
POWERING AHEAD: Gladstone Power Station's safety team Kaitlin Darrach, David Greinke, Jayd McKenzie.

How power station turned its safety rate around

NOT suffering a lost-time injury in more than two years has earned Gladstone Power Station recognition in a state award focused on safe workplaces.

The power station has been named as one of four finalists in the Queensland Safe Work and Return to Work Awards 2018 for its improvement in safety performance.

The site's all-injury frequency rate for employees and contractors is at its lowest point in five years.

Human resources and safety manager Nigel Warrington put the improvement down to a shift from a "systems-driven" safety program to a more face-to-face approach.

The site was recognised after judges assessed 148 nominations across the state for the "most significant improvement to work health and safety performance" category.

"We wanted to create a positive safety culture that was owned by each and every one of our 250 employees and contractors, rather than being controlled and driven by management," Mr Warrington said.

"Employees were given greater access, involvement and training in safety processes."

Mr Warrington said they also empowered employees to stop what they were doing and to make it safe if something didn't seem right.

"We are now aiming to maintain our fantastic safety record by keeping safety fresh and at the forefront of people's minds," he said.

Changes to incident reporting, pre-task risk assessment, overhaul and contractor safety, workplace condition monitoring, signage and messaging were also key in GPS's safety improvement journey.

The Safe Work and Return to Work Awards winners will be announced on Tuesday, October 2 in Brisbane.