Dory operations involve a fleet of small boats with only one or two people on board, fishing in a designated zone and reporting to a parent vessel overseeing their activities.
Dory operations involve a fleet of small boats with only one or two people on board, fishing in a designated zone and reporting to a parent vessel overseeing their activities.

‘High-risk’: Authorities crack down on fishing industry

COMMERCIAL fishermen are encouraged to attend a workshop in Gladstone to learn more about a campaign aimed at improving the safety culture in the high-risk industry.

Queensland Police Services and Australian Maritime Safety Authority are leading a campaign which focuses on education and national law requirements which apply to commercial dory fishing ­operations.

Dory fishing operations involve several tender boats - called dories - which have one or two people on board who fish in a designated zone while reporting to a parent vessel.

One of five free workshops to be held in Queensland this month for dory owners and operators will be in Gladstone on November 28 at PCYC Gladstone.

Water Police Sergeant Shaun Halson said the campaign was about making dory operations safe.

"By conducting targeted education and compliance activities with AMSA, the QPS is continuing to demonstrate our commitment in educating and engaging with members of the fishing industry," he said.

AMSA general manager of operations Allan Schwartz said several serious incidents in recent years showed risk-taking in the industry was unacceptably high.

"It equates to a poor safety culture that's putting lives at risk and that's unacceptable both from a community expectation and regulatory perspective," Mr Schwartz said.

The workshop will be held from 9am-1pm. To register visit amsa.gov.au/dory-workshops-registration.