A number of “design and construction issues” were believed to be responsible for causing “major damage” to parts of the building.
A number of “design and construction issues” were believed to be responsible for causing “major damage” to parts of the building.

Opal Tower report: It’s the designers, engineers fault

AN INDEPENDENT report commissioned by the NSW government into building defects at the troubled Opal Tower is expected to point the finger at the building's designers and engineers.

The state government is expected to hand down its final report into the 36-storey Sydney Olympic Park tower today more than eight weeks after cracking appeared on Christmas Eve, sparking the evacuation of around 300 residents.

The troubled Opal Tower, Sydney Olympic Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson
The troubled Opal Tower, Sydney Olympic Park. Picture: Dylan Robinson

Residents from up to 224 units are still living in temporary accommodation due to ongoing remedial works which involve the strengthening of beams on levels 4, 10 and 16, according to an update last week from builder Icon.

In relation to the case of the problem, a source close to the Opal Tower investigation said changes were made to the design of the building which made it "non-compliant" with the Building Code of Australia.

Construction defect photos. Supplied by A Current Affair
Construction defect photos. Supplied by A Current Affair

An interim report in January by engineering professors Mark Hoffman and John Carter found a number of "design and construction issues" were believed to be responsible for causing "major damage" to parts of the building.

The Daily Telegraph also understands one of the recommendations in the final report will include "assuring qualified people design buildings and that buildings are built to those designs".

 

It's believed the experts will recommend engineers be registered before working on a commercial or residential high-rise building.

It's further understood the independent experts didn't find any issues with private certifiers.

The NSW government announced a crackdown on "dodgy certifiers", including audits and a name and shame register, in the wake of the incident.

The design engineering firm behind Opal Tower, WSP Australia, is expected to make a statement today following the release of the report.

Any crack larger than 2mm is generally determined a defect. Source: Supplied by A Current Affair
Any crack larger than 2mm is generally determined a defect. Source: Supplied by A Current Affair