Gladstone man cut free from smashed car after driving high

19th April 2017 5:00 AM
Michael James Kilfoyle pleaded guilty to one charge of driving without due care and one charge of driving while a drug was present in his blood. Michael James Kilfoyle pleaded guilty to one charge of driving without due care and one charge of driving while a drug was present in his blood.

A BOYNE Island man has told a magistrate he nearly killed himself after getting behind the wheel high.

Michael James Kilfoyle pleaded guilty at the Gladstone Magistrates Court yesterday to one charge of driving without due care and one charge of driving while a drug was present in his blood.

Police prosecutor Balan Selvadurai said police were called to a car crash off Toolooa St on November 10 about 5.18am.

Mr Selvadurai said Kilfoyle was driving along Derby St and reached the intersection where he began to turn right on to Toolooa St.

Suddenly Kilfoyle became unconscious and lost control of the vehicle, causing it to turn more than 90 degrees, driving up on the curb, mount the gutter and crash into a tree, Mr Selvadurai said.

Kilfoyle regained conciousness, realised what had happened and tried to get out of the car, the court heard.

However, he was trapped in the car, and had to wait for emergency services to arrive to be cut out.

Upon arrival at the Gladstone Hospital a blood test was taken, where it was revealed Kilfoyle had smoked cannabis prior.

Kilfoyle, who represented himself in court, told Acting Gladstone Magistrate Neil Lavaring that, as a result, suffered from a fractured tail bone, rib and hip.

He told Mr Lavaring that he was still trying to cope with the loss of a good friend, who passed away in October from cancer.

Kilfoyle said the night before the crash he was caring for his friend's husband, who was suffering from "major grief”.

He admitted to smoking cannabis the same night.

"I haven't been able to drive since, as I can't afford to fix or buy a new car,” Kilfoyle said.

"I have had to rely on friends, taxis and public transport.”

Mr Lavaring asked Kilfoyle whether there was anyone else on the road when it happened, and whether he could have killed anyone.

Kilfoyle's response: "No thank God, but I nearly killed myself.”

"I was overcome with grief, that's why I fell asleep behind the wheel, it had less to do with drugs,” he said.

Kilfoyle was fined $1000 and lost his licence for three months.