Georgia Morris, 7, and sister Abbey, 5, at the Diabuddies Day held at Gold Coast on March 03, 2019. Photography: Patrick Hamilton
Georgia Morris, 7, and sister Abbey, 5, at the Diabuddies Day held at Gold Coast on March 03, 2019. Photography: Patrick Hamilton

The unusual symptoms leading to 7yo’s shock diagnosis

FOUR months ago seven-year-old Georgia Morris had lost weight, was constantly hungry, thirsty and cranky.

It was such a turnaround from the normally happy, healthy girl she was that mother Ashley Morris took her to the doctor.

Luckily she did.

Little Georgia was in the early stages of diabetic ketoacidosis and could have fallen into a diabetic coma.

"That meant a trip to the Gold Coast University Hospital," Ms Morris said.

"It turned out to be type one diabetes."

The Morris sisters enjoying their day out. Photography: Patrick Hamilton
The Morris sisters enjoying their day out. Photography: Patrick Hamilton

Type one diabetes is an auto-immune condition that attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, according to Diabetes Queensland, and can't be prevented.

It means Georgia will have to test her glucose levels for life.

Ms Morris said she needs to take insulin at breakfast, lunch and dinner and uses about 10-12 units a day on a glucose monitor.

The girls all dressed up as part of Diabuddies Day. Photography: Patrick Hamilton
The girls all dressed up as part of Diabuddies Day. Photography: Patrick Hamilton

But the diagnosis has meant Georgia is back to herself and Ms Morris says her old symptoms have disappeared.

On Saturday, Georgia, along with her mother, father John and two sisters Abbey, 5 and Scarlett, 2, visited Diabetes Queensland's first Diabuddies Day.

Dressed as Harley Quinn for the superhero themed event, Ms Morris said the day was great and they had received lots of useful advice from other families and Georgia had made some new friends.

The educational family day out was held at Nerang's Terrin Training.