A Gladstone woman had an outburst in court over a drug testing condition.
A Gladstone woman had an outburst in court over a drug testing condition.

Former truck driver protests drug testing condition

A GLADSTONE woman offered a probation order with a drug testing condition had an outburst in court insisting the latter requirement was “not good.”

Shira-Lee Michelle Priest, 45, pleaded guilty in Gladstone Magistrates Court on November 17 to drug-driving.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Merrilyn Hoskins said on October 9, Priest was stopped by police when a passenger ran out of the car she was driving.

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At the time Priest appeared as though she was under the influence of drugs.

She hesitated to answer questions, was agitated, constantly scratched at her face and had slurred speech.

Priest was asked if she was under the influence of a drug and she said she had been given a drug the night before by the man who ran away.

She didn’t know what she had taken because it was mixed in with a drink.

The prosecution was unable to tender an blood analysis to show which drug had been present and attempted to substitute the charge from a relevant drug charge to driving under the influence.

However defence lawyer Lauren Townsend did not consent to the change.

She told the court her client was formerly a truck driver in South Australia and had done well for herself, however when her family found out they drained her of about $60,000.

She said Priest had returned to Gladstone and estranged from some family.

Ms Townsend said her client had already started to address some of her issues by seeing a psychologist.

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Magistrate Bevan Manthey offered Priest a probation order with drug testing conditions which she protested.

“That’s not good,” Priest said.

“I’ll just stay off the road.”

Mr Manthey warned Priest it was either probation or a period of imprisonment.

“Before you get back on the bl---- road, I don’t want you having drugs in your bl---- system,” Mr Manthey said.

“That’s the idea of you being tested, and you sit there and say you don’t want to get tested.”

Priest said she was never told about drug testing conditions before the court was adjourned.

The matter returned with another warning issued by Mr Manthey.

“If I’m to put you back on the road, I want you clean,” he said.

Priest eventually agreed to the 12-month probation order with the drug testing condition.

She was also disqualified from driving for six months.