Emergency specialist at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital Dr David Rosengren is young drinkers not to meet hospital staff by accident. Picture: Annette Dew
Emergency specialist at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital Dr David Rosengren is young drinkers not to meet hospital staff by accident. Picture: Annette Dew

Emergency warning to boozed-up male risk-takers

HOSPITAL emergency departments have put boozed-up young men on notice - "we're not the family you want to see this Christmas".

Staff at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital's emergency ward are expecting 1500 young adult males will turn up over the next month, more than half of them because of alcohol-related injuries.

Metro North Health has launched a new campaign, urging young men "Don't meet us by accident".

Boozed-up young men are being urged to think about consequences before engaging in risk-tasking activities this festive season.
Boozed-up young men are being urged to think about consequences before engaging in risk-tasking activities this festive season.

Emergency physician Dr David Rosengren said young men should think before engaging in dangerous and potentially fatal activities, especially if under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

He said a split-second decision gone wrong could have life-altering consequences.

"To disable a young adult male for the rest of his life so he requires care, and in some cases 24-hour care, that's a massive impact on themselves those around them," he said.

Dr Rosengren said common injuries over Christmas and New Year were burns from recklessness around fires and permanent disability from falling from moving utes.

Injuries from playing with new toys or fireworks, are also common at this time of year, as well as glassing or coward punch attacks and fractures from balcony falls.

Dr Rosengren said emergency department staff were often distressed by the harrowing injuries that presented during Christmas shifts.

"All of my colleagues will be able to tell stories of when they've had to sit down and have conversations with families, which is particularly hard at Christmas time," he said.

Health Minister Steven Miles said the campaign would hopefully help reduce the number of preventable deaths.

"We absolutely want to see young people out there having a great time, but we are pleading with each and every one to remember that all it takes is one stupid decision to change your life, or your mate's life, forever," he said. "If you are having a few drinks, think about how your actions could impact those around you."