Cops convicted of DV offences still serving

THEIR role is to serve and protect, but a number of serving Queensland police officers have domestic violence convictions, it can finally be revealed. FILE PIC

The Courier-Mail has obtained records showing three serving officers and three administration staff have domestic violence convictions.

Police staff are also facing 28 active domestic violence orders with 16 for officers and 11 administration members, which could include Public Safety Business Agency employees.

The figures can be reported after months of inquiries including a Right to Information request in January this year.

But the numbers could be much higher with the service stating the accuracy of the data is based on how QPS employees' names are entered in its computer records system QPRIME.

At the same time the QPS is knocking back recruit applicants who are current respondents to DV incidents.

Senior officers have raised serious concerns, questioning if the QPS, which is the lead agency for domestic violence prevention in Queensland, has double standards.

Separately, the QPS was asked how many successful applicants in the past five years were previously subject to domestic violence orders and how many were accepted with current orders.

A QPS spokesman said: "No person who is currently a respondent in a domestic violence incident is considered suitable to be offered acceptance as a police recruit."

A senior officer told The Courier-Mail the QPS response to the issue suggested serving police were given “special consideration” compared to everyday members of the public. FILE PICTURE
A senior officer told The Courier-Mail the QPS response to the issue suggested serving police were given “special consideration” compared to everyday members of the public. FILE PICTURE

A senior officer told The Courier-Mail the QPS response to the issue suggested serving police were given "special consideration" compared to everyday members of the public.

"The exact same conduct which would see a police recruit applicant excluded, might see serving police officers permitted to continue in their career unaffected," the officer said.

"I would suggest there would be employees such as those in the security industry and professional footballers who lose their job as a result of having a DV order, but police officers are given special treatment and avoid losing their job.

Queensland police respond to hundreds of domestic violence incidents every week. They also deal with the cases in courts. As a result of being under a DV order, police officers must hand back their weapon and work in other duties.

DV orders may not lead to charges or convictions and some officers say some are made falsely to impact them.

Despite requesting to know duties the officers perform while on orders and the locations where they work, the RTI said the "documents do not exist".

Of the officers with domestic violence orders, one works in the Ethical Standards Command, there are six in the Brisbane Region, three in the south eastern region, one in the southern region, two in the northern region, one in Operations Support Command and one in State Crime Command.

When asked about the recruiting process in general the QPS spokesman said it aimed to ensure a recruits' past conduct, behaviour and integrity was of a very high standard.

The spokesman said it was possible for people with convictions to be admitted as a recruit.

When someone was knocked back they could be given an exclusionary sanction period which could range from a year to permanently unsuitable.

The Courier-Mail revealed in November last year the QPS could not say how many officers had domestic violence convictions and protection orders against them.