WORRY: Lock the Gate has concerns about APLNG's plan to frack 1000 wells near Injune, to help feed gas into its Curtis Island facility.
WORRY: Lock the Gate has concerns about APLNG's plan to frack 1000 wells near Injune, to help feed gas into its Curtis Island facility. APLNG

Companies respond to concerns on fracking, gas pipeline

COMPANIES have responded to concerns about projects that will feed gas to Curtis Island LNG plants.   Lock the Gate Alliance has criticised APLNG's environmental authority amendment to frack 1000 wells near Carnarvon Gorge, and Jemena's proposed gas pipeline from the Galilee Basin to Gladstone.    The group accused APLNG of "quietly" lodging an environmental authority amendment to frack nearly 1000 gas wells near Carnarvon Gorge National Park, north of Injune.    It said the amendment cost just $327.60 and would not trigger the need for a new Environmental Impact Statement.    The group said farmers in the area were already struggling because of the drought and bores could be "irreparably drained and damaged", if fracking was permitted.    Don't Frack the Outback spokesperson Leanne Brummell said there was a lack of transparency surrounding APLNG's plan to frack.   "It is appalling the Queensland Government does not require amendments like this to be more widely advertised - documents are only online and are not even physically available in Injune," she said.    "We have also been given just 20 days to make a submission."    An APLNG spokesperson said the application related to the "whole of project life" and it did not mean all proposed wells would be drilled.    "Within this application we are required to undertake a comprehensive risk assessment of any stimulation activity to prevent any significant environmental harm," they said.    "This assessment finds there will be no impact to groundwater or nearby springs when following standard mitigation measures associated with this activity."    The environment group also raised questions on Jemena's proposed gas pipeline from the Glenaras gas project in the Galilee Basin to Gladstone's LNG sites.   It said the pipeline would cross 18 watercourses and place Queensland's iconic Channel Country "under threat".    A Jemena spokesperson said the company had a long history of safely managing major natural gas transmission pipelines.    "To this end, there are robust environmental management processes to follow, which are subject to Federal and State Government approval," they said.    "We are in the very early stages of understanding the exact details of this as it relates to the (pipeline) project, and will have more to say on this in the future."    Lock the Gate said the Glenaras gas project would "likely have a significant impact" on groundwater resources too.