HIGH AND DRY: Kelvin Peters from Hyblah Hay at Nagoorin has been keeping up with high demand for feed.
HIGH AND DRY: Kelvin Peters from Hyblah Hay at Nagoorin has been keeping up with high demand for feed. Matt Taylor GLA030818FARM

DROUGHT: Boyne Valley farmers face the big dry

THE last good rain in the Boyne Valley was in October, according to a local farmer - one of many primary producers feeling the dry.

While not yet declared drought-affected - like all of Western and Central Queensland - the Boyne Valley's cattle properties are fields of brown.

Creeks are running dry and farmers have been forced to supplement stockfeed.

Kelvin Peters from Hyblah Hay at Nagoorin has been keeping up with high demand for feed.
Kelvin Peters said he felt lucky to be farming the Boyne Valley rather than drought affected areas further inland. Matt Taylor GLA030818FARM

Kelvin Peters farms a 130ha property between Ubobo and Nagoorin.

He's partially drought-proofed his business by growing hay for sale as stockfeed, meaning when times are tough, he doesn't have to buy feed.

Kelvin owns another cattle property at Monto and has been supplementing feed there "for a little while now" with hay, silage and lick blocks.

The blocks help the cattle to digest the dry grass.

It won't be long before he'll start feeding his 80 breeders in the Boyne Valley hay too.

"For people like our hay customers, who have to buy feed for their cattle, it's becoming more difficult," Kelvin said.

Shayne Mossman has farmed 1200-oddha at Ubobo for 25 years.

He has about 550 breeders and has implemented measures to get them through the dry patch.

Shayne also produces and sells his own hay and said the phones had been running hot with buyers.

"I had a shed full but now there's only enough for me to keep for myself," he said.

"There's no green grass, just a body of old dry feed.

"Cattle are foraging near creeks where they normally wouldn't go.

"They'll start getting stuck in creeks and dams soon."

Like Kelvin, he was philosophical about the dry conditions, which so often hit the valley at this time of year.

"Every day is a day closer to rain," he said.

The Bureau of Meteorology has predicted significant rainfall for the Gladstone Region in October.