Israel Folau is ramping up his legal battle after being sacked by Rugby Australia. Picture: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images
Israel Folau is ramping up his legal battle after being sacked by Rugby Australia. Picture: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images

Bolt: Folau battle is a fight for freedom of many

The Left claims Israel Folau's case is just a contractual dispute. But a similar battle being waged in Britain's Court of Appeal suggests it's actually a crusade for the freedom of Australians, writes Andrew Bolt.

Australia's Israel Folau is the superstar player sacked by Rugby Australia. Britain's Folau is Felix Ngole - and he's no superstar at all.

But Ngole can still give Folau some coaching - on how to beat the bigots who got both men sacked for quoting some Bible passages on gays on social media.

Ngole is a devout Christian who four years ago was studying for a master's degree in social work.

But then he joined a debate on Facebook about a marriage registrar in America who had been jailed for refusing to issue marriage licences to same-sex couples.

Ngole explained why Christianity opposed gay marriage, and quoted verses from the Bible saying homosexual acts were a sin - just as Folau did on Instagram.

Israel Folau is ramping up his legal battle after being sacked by Rugby Australia. Picture: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images
Israel Folau is ramping up his legal battle after being sacked by Rugby Australia. Picture: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images

I don't think homosexuality is a sin at all, but that does indeed seem to be what the Bible says. So ignore it.

Yet a few months later, some anonymous dobber reported Ngole to Sheffield University, which told Ngole he had brought the profession of social work into disrepute by quoting the Bible on gays, and expelled him.

Shockingly, a court upheld that expulsion.

Apparently, being a Christian is incompatible with being a social worker, which is mad and ahistorical when you consider all the charity and compassion Christianity has inspired - all those Christian hospitals, hospices, charities and soup kitchens. Not to mention the Red Cross.

Ngole appealed, and what the university's representative said in court was even more incredible: that if the university learned some student had quoted the Bible's teachings on gays even in their own church, the university would sack them, too, from the social work course.

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The Court of Appeal was astonished: "If social workers and social work students must not express such views, Christian views on same-sex relations, then what of art therapists, occupational therapists, paramedics, psychologists, radiographers, speech and language therapists …?" it asked (and what of Muslims, who have similar teachings on gays, it added).

"No such believing Christian would be secure in such a profession unless they resolved never to express their views on this issue other than in private. Even then, what if a private expression of views was overheard and reported?"

Some experts claim Folau's case is just a contractual dispute.

Britain's Court of Appeal suggests it's actually a fight for the freedom of many.

Let's hope judges here are taking notes.