Bill Shorten has promised to inject $18 million into the domestic violence program if elected. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas
Bill Shorten has promised to inject $18 million into the domestic violence program if elected. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Shorten to reverse DV program funding cut

OPPOSITION Leader Bill Shorten has revealed plans to reverse cuts to a national domestic violence initiative which screens the homes of victims for recording devices.

Funding to the Keeping Women Safe In Their Homes program expired last year but Mr Shorten has promised to inject $18 million into the program if elected.

Women who are fleeing abusive partners can access the programs to upgrade locks on their homes and even deploy a security expert to sweep their home for bugs.

Mr Shorten said the program would help women feel safe in their own homes and described the need for the service as urgent.

"Women should be able to end violent and abusive relationships as safely and as quickly as possible - this as an immediate and urgent priority and Labor is determined to match our words with practical measures like this," Mr Shorten said.

"This program provides practical help for women and their children in their homes, allowing them to live safely away from perpetrators."

Victims of domestic violence would be able to consult with security experts.
Victims of domestic violence would be able to consult with security experts.

Mr Shorten also said that Labor would focus on "cultural and structural" change to curb family violence.

"This magnitude of change can only be brought about by strong and sustained leadership, at all levels," he said.

Victims of domestic violence would also be able to consult with security experts and devise safety plans.