BEATING THE BLUES: Deepwater evacuees and musician couple Ken and Leah Chynoweth-Tidy played a show in Calliope to take a well-deserved break.
BEATING THE BLUES: Deepwater evacuees and musician couple Ken and Leah Chynoweth-Tidy played a show in Calliope to take a well-deserved break.

'Been a long week': evacuees on staying hopeful and informed

IT HAS been more than a week since Leah and Ken Chynoweth-Tidy evacuated their house at Deepwater.

The couple are staying with friends in Agnes Water, waiting patiently to return home.

Leah Chynoweth-Tidy said waiting was "the worst part".

"The days are quite long because you're normally used to doing things yourself in day to day life, so with not having those things to do, the days feel much longer," Mrs Chynoweth-Tidy said.

"It has been a long week."

She and her husband Ken are musicians and spent the weekend in Calliope to play a Friday night show at the Calliope Central Bowls Club.

"It was something we arranged before all this happened but we thought it would be a good thing to take our mind off things and also earn few dollars, which are much needed at the moment," she said.

"We saw a couple of other people who were there from our area who had evacuated as well.

"It was nice to catch up with them and give each other a hug ... just tell each other to stay strong until we get back."

Mrs Chynoweth-Tidy said some residents in the same situation as her and her husband needed to remember to stay calm and listen to authorities regarding fire updates.

"We're all in the same boat," she said.

"There's a little bit of finger pointing going on about how things should have been done.

"Hindsight is a great thing to have but my advice ... is be patient with the authorities, they're doing the very best job they can and they're doing an amazing job."

Mrs Chynoweth-Tidy said her house on Capricornia Dr was reported unharmed the day following evacuations.

"We're all keen to get home and see what we've got left and hopefully that will occur sooner rather than later," she said.

"We have heard that our place was saved on Monday night but to a certain extent you don't know what's left and what's been damaged.

"Even if your place is standing there's still a lot of clean-up to be done, and until you get back you can't actually wrap your head around it."

She said she and her husband were frequenting community meetings to stay informed by QPS and QFES workers, avoiding the "rumours and innuendo on social media".

"The best way to find out for sure is to go to these meetings and find out from the people who are actually on the front line," she said.

"Everyone's very keen to get home obviously, but the conditions need to made safe in all areas.

"Just support each other and be positive rather than going on about the negatives ... discussion about why and how all of this happened is for later."