Abbot Point coal port
Abbot Point coal port

Adani slammed over floodwater release

ADANI has come under fire for not applying for a temporary emissions licence before it released water from Abbot Point coal point into the adjacent Caley Valley Wetland.

An Adani spokesman said it did not apply for the licence during north Queensland's extreme weather event as it was confident its improved infrastructure and processes at the terminal would be sufficient to manage flood waters.

"However because of the very high rainfall that has caused flooding and devastation across north Queensland, large volumes of floodwater from surrounding properties entered the terminal site and exceeded the capacity of our water management system," she said.

The Department of Environment and Science received its water testing results it undertook on February 8, which revealed the total suspended solids taken from a point which flows into the wetland, was 33mg per litre.

This is 3mg/l over the maximum limit.

Total suspended solids can include silt, decaying plant, animal matter, industrial wastes and sewage.

 

Abbot Point coal port
Abbot Point coal port

 

In Adani's own sampling on February 7, the TSS level was 58mg/l.

A department spokesman said an investigation into the alleged non-compliance had begun.

"DES will now issue the coal terminal operator with a show-cause letter inviting the company to make representations as to why enforcement action should not be taken," he said.

Adani confirmed the floodwater did not enter the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Abbot Point Operation chief executive officer Dwayne Freeman said it was not "coal-laden sludge".

"This is a very minor elevation in total suspended solids, following an extraordinary weather event that caused flooding and damage to much of north Queensland including many homes, businesses and farms," he said.