There were eight emaciated horses and 22 dead horses found on a property in the Toowoomba region.
There were eight emaciated horses and 22 dead horses found on a property in the Toowoomba region.

‘Active’ racehorse among those emaciated on property

ANIMAL Liberation Queensland claim a racehorse listed as 'active' by Racing Australia is among one of the eight surviving horses on a Toowoomba region property.

The animal rights group also claims to have identified five racehorses out of the 22 horses found dead.

They said one was still listed as 'active', two were listed as retired, and two were listed as deceased as of January 20.

The group has started a petition to send emails to Minister for Agriculture Mark Furner.

Despite more than 2500 emails being sent, the group said it felt Biosecurity Queensland was still not doing enough to protect the welfare of the remaining horses.

Animal Liberation Queensland's executive director, Chay Neal, alleged the owner had not been providing high enough quality food to keep the horses alive.

"Kind neighbours have been giving the horses small amounts of extra food over the last week or so, as they have been monitoring the feeding routine by the owner, who has only been attending once per day," Mr Neal said.

"The action by these neighbours has meant that no further horses have died."

There were eight emaciated horses and 22 dead horses found on a property in the Toowoomba region.
There were eight emaciated horses and 22 dead horses found on a property in the Toowoomba region.

Mr Neal claimed when he visited the property last week, neighbours told him they had been instructed to stop feeding the horses by Biosecurity Queensland officers.

"We are extremely concerned about the fate of the remaining horses and have questions regarding the feeding regimen and monitoring by the department," he said.

"Waiting for more horses to die before taking action and prosecuting the owner is gross negligence by the department."

While Biosecurity Queensland could not confirm or deny whether neighbours had been instructed to stop feeding the horses, a Biosecurity Queensland spokesman said the department was still working with the owner "to ensure appropriate feed is being provided to the remaining eight horses".

"BQ is monitoring the care of the horses and while the recovery process will take some time, we are pleased to report the horses are gaining strength," the spokesman said.

"We cannot make detailed public comment about specifics of the case which could compromise an active investigation."

The spokesman said department dealt with multiple animal welfare complaints on a daily basis.

"Anybody who is drought affected and concerned about feeding their animals should seek advice from their vet and have plans in place to source appropriate feed," he said.