Melissa Peacock plants one of the first windmills at Canoe Point Tannum Sands as party of a community art project.
Melissa Peacock plants one of the first windmills at Canoe Point Tannum Sands as party of a community art project.

‘A great outcome’: Windmill project soars

AN art project six months in the making came to fruition in just 15 minutes at Tannum Sands on Saturday.

A collaboration between Choice, Passion, Life Gladstone, Conservation Volunteers Australia and Melissa Peacock from A Country Arts Practice helped plant 100 handmade paper windmills at Canoe Point.

Seeds from native plant kangaroo grass are embedded in the windmills, which will germinate as the paper decomposes.

Windmills planted at Canoe Point as part of a community arts project.
Windmills planted at Canoe Point as part of a community arts project.

“It ended up being exactly how I envisioned,” project manager Melissa Peacock said.

“That’s a great outcome.”

The windmills should break down between three to five months, however dry conditions may make the process take longer.

Ms Peacock said she was interested to see how the wildlife interact with the windmills, as a similar installation at Joe Joseph Park had some windmills missing pieces.

“Birds or ducks probably got to them and had been a bit curious,” she said.

The morning spent installing the artwork was a celebration of inclusivity with catering provided by Incredible Edibles - a business which provides work for adults with disabilities.

“That’s what I’m all about,” Ms Peacock said.

“It’s about utilising local resources as well, often the ones not everyone knows about.”

The project was funded by the Fitzroy Basin Association and the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, along with Gladstone Area Water Board.

The project site is managed by Conservation Volunteers Australia and Gladstone Regional Council.